Хаяг:   

Юнескогын гудамж, Сүхбаатар дүүрэг, Далай Тауэр

Шуудангийн хаяг:     Ш/Х 14230, Улаанбаатар хот          

Утас:                           70120012

И-мэйл хаяг:              info@transparency.mn

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Авлига гэж юу вэ?

Транспэрэнси Интернэшнл:

"Авлига гэдэг нь итгэж хүлээлгэсэн эрх мэдлийг амин хувийн сонирхолоор ашиглах явдал юм. Авлигын өртөг, өртөгдсөн салбараас хамаарч жижиг авлига, өндөр түвшний авлига, улс төрийн авлига гэх мэт төрлүүдтэй байж болно"

PETTY CORRUPTION -  Жижиг Авлига

Everyday abuse of entrusted power by public officials in their interactions with ordinary citizens, who often are trying to access basic goods or services in places like hospitals, schools, police departments and other agencies.

POLITICAL CORRUPTION – улс төрийн авлига

Manipulation of policies, institutions and rules of procedure in the allocation of resources and financing by political decision makers, who abuse their position to sustain their power, status and wealth.  

GRAND CORRUPTION – Өндөр түвшний авлига

The abuse of high-level power that benefits the few at the expense of the many, and causes serious and widespread harm to individuals and society. It often goes unpunished.

What is the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI)? 

The CPI scores and ranks countries/territories based on how corrupt a country’s public sector is perceived to be. It is a composite index, a combination of surveys and assessments of corruption, collected by a variety of reputable institutions. The CPI is the most widely used indicator of corruption worldwide.

Why is the CPI based on perceptions? 

Corruption generally comprises illegal activities, which are deliberately hidden and only come to light through scandals, investigations or prosecutions. There is no meaningful way to assess absolute levels of corruption in countries or territories on the basis of hard empirical data. Possible attempts to do so, such as by comparing bribes reported, the number of prosecutions brought or studying court cases directly linked to corruption, cannot be taken as definitive indicators of corruption levels. Instead, they show how effective prosecutors, the courts or the media are in investigating and exposing corruption. Capturing perceptions of corruption of those in a position to offer assessments of public sector corruption is the most reliable method of comparing relative corruption levels across countries.

In the 2017 assessment, Mongolia scored 36 out of 100, ranking as 103 from 180 countries.

If you would like to read an analysis by TI Secretariat on the Asia Pacific region you can find it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What are the costs of corruption?

Corruption impacts societies in a multitude of ways. In the worst cases, it costs lives. Short of this, it costs people their freedom, health or money. The cost of corruption can be divided into four main categories: political, economic, social and environmental.

On the political front, corruption is a major obstacle to democracy and the rule of law. In a democratic system, offices and institutions lose their legitimacy when they’re misused for private advantage. This is harmful in established democracies, but even more so in newly emerging ones. It is extremely challenging to develop accountable political leadership in a corrupt climate.

Economically, corruption depletes national wealth. Corrupt politicians invest scarce public resources in projects that will line their pockets rather than benefit communities, and prioritise high-profile projects such as dams, power plants, pipelines and refineries over less spectacular but more urgent infrastructure projects such as schools, hospitals and roads. Corruption also hinders the development of fair market structures and distorts competition, which in turn deters investment.

Corruption corrodes the social fabric of society. It undermines people's trust in the political system, in its institutions and its leadership. A distrustful or apathetic public can then become yet another hurdle to challenging corruption.

Environmental degradation is another consequence of corrupt systems. The lack of, or non-enforcement of, environmental regulations and legislation means that precious natural resources are carelessly exploited, and entire ecological systems are ravaged. From mining, to logging, to carbon offsets, companies across the globe continue to pay bribes in return for unrestricted destruction.

What do you do to fight corruption?

Our three guiding principles are: build partnerships, proceed step-by-step and stay non-confrontational. We have learned from experience that corruption can only be kept in check if representatives from government, business and civil society work together to develop standards and procedures they all support. We also know that corruption can’t be rooted out in one big sweep. Rather, fighting it is a step-by-step, project-by-project process. Our non-confrontational approach is necessary to get all relevant parties around the negotiating table.